Creating A River of Web Media Content

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Image via CrunchBase

For the longest time the content that has been produced has fit into very nice and well defined categories, and there was a commonly understood structure to it all. But the time is approaching fast that ideas about content online will shift. When it happens, lines will blur around our friends “blogs”, “posts”, and “comments”.

If at the start of blogging everyone had their own individual blogs and people made comments isolated to that website, then what popularity meant was that the activity was concentrated on your blog and your blog’s stream of content and engagement was bigger. The bigger the stream, the more links you got, and the more comments visitors left for you.

Streams of  Content

Then people realized they could create streams for all sorts of their crap online, not only their long-form written content. They created streams of photos, videos, micro-messages, micro-videos, liked, shared, and bookmarked content. Each of theses all had there own streams taking into account again things like visitors, links, and comments.

Skip ahead to 2009 when tools like DISQUS and IntenseDebate try and bring in and collect all of your comments from different blogs. And at the same time, new tools like Backtype are looking at it from an entirely different perspective.

Get Rid of The Streams

Whenever you fill out the “Website” or “URL” field in a comment form when you publish a comment on a blog or other website, BackType attributes it to you. We give comment authors a profile featuring all the comments they’ve written on the Internet.Backtype.com

That’s pretty exiting stuff. BackType does something predictive of what the next iteration of the web will be able to do:

Query: “Computer! Find all of Malcolm’s comments [on the Internet]!”
Result: http://www.backtype.com/people?q=Malcolm+Bastien

That’s really powerful. One of the great things about it is that it’s not local to one stream. The more queries like this are integrated into the rest of the web and our tools – perhaps by creating a Backtype plugin for Ubiquity – then the web will grow to another level.

These streams are joining together to form a river.

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